Wednesday, 9 May 2012

Clever, Clever Split Chain Method

Well, that's what I think anyway!

Along my cybertravels (I do a lot of travelling), I found a video entitled "Cadena Dividida - Método de Marie Smith".  Upon watching said video, I realised that this method was MUCH better than what I had tried to do in the past.  I didn't like split chains.  No, I didn't like split chains.  But after learning this new method, I do!

Unconnected, I ended up exchanging many messages with the wonderful Marie Smith until I eventually realised she was the same Marie Smith of the Split Chain method I'd seen and she was happy for me to make a video of her clever method.  What's particularly great about this method is that it works whether you do traditional or front-side/back-side tatting.  The movements are just reversed.

Although the available video is very good, I still felt that by making another, it would help to widen exposure to Marie's method.  Also the title of the other video is in Spanish which means that people searching for "Split Chain" won't be able to find it.  And one more thing:  the video doesn't show both ways of making the chain.  Great video nonetheless, thank you to the maker for enabling me to discover this method and to Marie for coming up with it!  I love it.

Here is the first video for those who tat using the traditional method:
(ie. always starting elements with the first half of the double stitch)
If you click on the YouTube logo above, you will 
be able to watch the video in larger format.


And here is the second video for those who prefer to tat FSBS:
If you click on the YouTube logo above, you will 
be able to watch the video in larger format.



Perhaps tatters already know this method but it's certainly new to me.  Let me know if you were using it already or what you think of it if it's new to you as well!

Best wishes,

17 comments:

  1. OMG, Frivole! That is absolutely brilliant! Usually I do not have too much trouble with my method, but this is so easy! And the stitches are so neat!

    I grabbed the nearest thread - white #50 and tried immediately...even with this skinny white stuff, it worked like a charm! Thank you and thank you so much Marie Smith, whose videos I have often learned so much from. She is an amazing tatter!
    Happy Dancing Fox : ))

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've never had any particular problem with split chains, and I use a couple of different methods of executing them, but keeping a loop of thread over the index to make access back into the stitch cap easier is indeed brilliant. I have yet to try this trick, but would suppose that it also serves to prevent the core thread from stretching out as the stitches are formed by keeping tension on the shuttle join until the first stitches are complete. Many thanks to both you and Marie Smith!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow- even I can do that! Thank you for the lovely, clear video. Now I'm off to find Marie to see what else she has too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That is really neat and I think may be easier for someone to learn. You're less likely to tangle the threads.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great video Frivole! You drove me to comment again. Hopefully this time I don't stick my foot in it this time. It happens I met Marie on visit to Palmetto's Tat Days , and she showed me the method herself (with her husband standing proudly behind her enjoying her demonstrating her cleverness to us at lunch). Jane Eborall wrote up her split chain method and posted it here http://www.e.n.e.btinternet.co.uk/FastEasy.pdf.
    The more reference materials, the better, I think. People vary in how they learn and remember. Some need moving pictures, some audio; some do better with stills and/or with words they can read. The movement in this case really helps, though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh...it is indeed the same as what is presented on Jane's site; a method that I have used a number of times, but not adopted as the default one. Duuuh! (slaps hand to forehead) What threw me was the flipped orientation. You are absolutely correct about the ability to see the movement really helping in understanding this one. I never had any trouble with the stitch manipulation, but I missed out on how crucial a role the medulla plays in easing the process and maintaining tension on the thread, so I reverted to forming the two halves of the stitch independently, as I had always done.

      Delete
    2. Hi Mimi, it's nice you got to learn the method directly from Marie. I'm getting so envious of all these people who talk about Palmetto... Wish I could go!

      Delete
    3. well, I found out that Jane Emborall has changed her website and the link that MimiD gave us has already changed. The new link is: http://www.janeeborall.freeservers.com/FastEasy.pdf for the written instructions on how to do Marie Smith's easy split chain.

      Delete
  6. I've never tried a split chain, but I think I'll spend some time with it when school gets out for the summer. Thanks to you and Marie for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for the awesome video tutorials. I learned the method from Jane E's diagramming of Marie Smiths method. I've met Marie at Palmetto and she is an amazing tatter. There can never be too much teaching material.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Brilliant video, I wanted to grab my shuttles to try but I will have to come back later and try, thank you for doing such a brilliant video. I hate split chains and try to avoid them but this looks so easy I hope I can do it.
    Margaret

    ReplyDelete
  9. Very clever manipulation to get that split chain! Thanks for sharing using the video.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Absobloominglutely wonderful. I was making split chains like I cover a bone ring, it works but it's not always as neat as it should be. I tried both methods last night and it's so neat and can't tell which is direct and which is regular tatting! Thanks for the video. Sometimes a good visual is just what's needed for things to sink in!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So glad you like it! My split chains never looked neat either until I discovered this method so I wanted to share with as many people as possible!

      Delete
  11. Wow that's amazing! I tried the traditional method a while ago but it didn't look neat. I think I'll have another go at mastering this now :)

    Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I might even try a split chain now -- I've always avoided them before!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to write a comment, it's always appreciated!